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Laws Supporting Breastfeeding
Kentucky Laws

KRS 211.755 - An ACT relating to breastfeeding

Reads as follows:
(1)        Not withstanding any other provision of the law, a mother may breastfeed her baby
or express breastmilk in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise
authorized to be.  Breastfeeding a child or expressing breastmilk as part of breastfeeding
shall not be considered an act of public indecency and shall not be considered indecent
exposure, sexual conduct, lewd touching, or obscenity.
(2)        A municipality may not enact an ordinance that prohibits or restricts a mother
breastfeeding a child or expressing breastmilk in a public or private location where the
mother and child are otherwise authorized to be.  In a municipal ordinance, indecent
exposure, sexual conduct, lewd touching, obscenity, and similar terms do not include the act
of a mother breastfeeding a child in a public or private location where the mother and child
are otherwise authorized to be.
(3)        No person shall interfere with a mother breastfeeding her child in any location,
public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be.


KRS 29A.100 - An ACT relating to jury duty

Item (4)        The judge shall excuse a mother who is breastfeeding a child or expressing
breastmilk from jury service until such time as the child is old enough that the mother is no
longer breastfeeding the child.
National Law

Section 7(r) of the Fair Labor Standards Act - Break Time for Nursing Mothers
Provision

This amendment was made as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and
took effect March 23,2010.  The amendment reads as follows:

(r)(1)        An employer shall provide -
           A.  a reasonable break time for an employee to express breast milk for her nursing
child for 1 year after the child's birth each time such employee has need to express the milk;
and
           B.  a place, other than a bathroom, that is shielded from view and free from intrusion
from coworkers and the public, which may be used by an employee to express breast milk.

(2)        An employer shall not be required to compensate an employee receiving reasonable
break time under paragraph (1) for an work time spent for such purpose.

(3)        An employer that employs less than 50 employees shall not be subject to the
requirements of this subsection, if such requirements would impose an undue hardship by
causing the employer significant difficulty or expense when considered in relation to the size,
financial resources, nature, or structure or the employer's business.

(4)        Nothing in this subsection shall preempt a State law that provides greater
protections to employees than the protections provided for under this subsection.

For more information about this law
click here to visit the U.S. Department of Labor's website.